Closing down car security loopholes

We are continuing to release security ratings for new cars. Based on a series of physical and digital tests, the ratings assess the all-round security of a new car, while closing down security loopholes as they appear.

One such loophole is the keyless entry / start vulnerability, which thieves are exploiting using a technique known as the Relay Attack.

It’s a huge concern for car owners. And it’s the reason why Thatcham Research has released it’s second set of security ratings for 2019.

It means you are informed before buying a new car that could be vulnerable to the Relay Attack.

We’ve rated 18 new cars so far in 2019. Only those with a fix to the vulnerability can gain a Superior rating.

Scroll down to see the latest ratings and learn more about keyless entry / start and the Relay Attack by checking out our infographic.

Car security ratings June 2019

7 new cars were assessed in this round of security testing.

4 received Poor ratings, because their keyless entry / start systems were found to be vulnerable to the Relay Attack.

The Superior rated cars all have solutions to the Relay Attack in place.

BMW 7 Series

BMW X7

DS3 Crossback

Mazda 3

Porsche 911

Toyota RAV-4

Volvo S60

Car security ratings March 2019

In March 2019 11 new cars were assessed.

Five received Poor ratings, again because they are vulnerable to the Relay Attack.

The Superior rated cars all have fixes in place.

The Suzuki Jimny received an Unacceptable rating, despite not having keyless entry / start, due to its low levels of all-round security.

Audi e-tron

Ford Mondeo

Hyundai Nexo

Jaguar XE

Kia ProCeed

Land Rover Evoque

Lexus UX

Mercedes B-Class

Porsche Macan

Suzuki Jimny

Toyota Corolla Hybrid

The New Categories

SUPERIOR

GOOD

BASIC

Poor

Unacceptable

Security at Different Price Points

Cars at different price points have different levels of security:

Up to £20,000 – fundamental security features, but not some of the extra layers found on higher-priced vehicles. Typically, a vehicle within this value range would include a Thatcham Research certified immobiliser, perimeter alarm, double-locking to all doors, locking wheel bolts and attack-resistant mechanical security.

£20,000 to £35,000 – high standard security features, but not some of the extra layers found on higher-priced vehicles. Typically, a vehicle within this value range should include the security from the Up to £20,000 range plus a Thatcham Research certified alarm system.

£35,000+ – security of the very highest standard. Typically, a vehicle within this value range would include the security from the £20,000 to £35,000 range plus Thatcham Research certified alarm system with tilt sensor and a Thatcham Research certified tracking system.

In most cases the vehicle manufacturer can advise on suitable security solutions or upgrades. Alternatively, certified aftermarket options can be found by clicking here